PEX Race & Diversity

Race & Diversity courses develop a sophisticated understanding of race and racism as dynamic concepts, pointing to the ways in which race intersects with other group identifications such as gender, class, ethnicity, religion, age, sexual orientation or disability.

Race & Diversity courses are intended to teach students how to:

  • Recognize the ways in which race intersects with other group identifications or ascriptions: gender, class, ethnicity, sexual orientation, religion, disability, age;
  • Understand the relationships among diversity, justice and power;
  • Explore what it means for individuals and institutions to exist in a multi-racial, multicultural world;
  • Investigate the various forms race and racism has taken in different places and times; and
  • Discuss race matters with diverse others in relation to personal experience.

PEX RACE AND DIVERSITY Courses (GD)

Dimensions of Diversity: What’s Brewing in the Melting Pot?

TOURISM & HOSPITALITY MANAGEMENT 0827
Are we really living in a melting pot? How important are the differences and similarities among individuals? The purpose of this course will be to focus on a variety of issues related to the nature of personal and cultural identify within a diverse American society. Specifically, this course will explore critical factors that shape one’s place or standing in society (e.g., race, disability, age, gender, and sexuality). The meaning and significance of these dimensions will be explored as they relate to the societal and technological complexities of the 21st Century. The best practice and research in racism, inequality, and social injustice in industries such as sport, leisure, tourism and healthcare will be explored.

Embodying Pluralism

DANCE 0828
Dance and the arts are vehicles of societal change. As you challenge and extend your perceptions of “self” and “other” in a pluralistic society, you will explore aspects of identity, difference, and diversity from aesthetic and ethical perspectives. Race, ethnicity, gender, class, and other social phenomena will be studied as elements that form the fabric of American society. Theory from lectures on historical and philosophical perspectives will be thoroughly integrated in immersive, active studio practices. The purpose of this course is to illuminate personal, social and cultural dynamics of race and diversity in the United States.

History & Significance of Race in America

AFRICAN AMERICAN STUDIES 0829, ANTHROPOLOGY 0829, GEOGRAPHY & URBAN STUDIES 0829, HISTORY 0829, POLITICAL SCIENCE 0829, SOCIOLOGY 0829, 0929
Why were relations between Native Amer-icans and whites violent almost from the beginning of European settlement? How could slavery thrive in a society founded on the principle that “all men are created equal”? How comparable were the experiences of Irish, Jewish, and Italian immigrants, and why did people in the early 20th century think of them as separate “races”? What were the causes and consequences of Japanese Americans’ internment in military camps during World War II? Are today’s Mexican immigrants unique, or do they have something in common with earlier immigrants? Using a variety of written sources and outstanding documentaries, this course examines the racial diversity of America and its enduring consequences.

Immigration and the American Dream: Hearing the Immigrant Voice>

ANTHROPOLOGY 0831, CRITICAL LANGUAGES 0831, HISTORY 0831, ITALIAN 0831, 0931, RUSSIAN 0831, SOCIOLOGY 0831
As a Temple student, you go to school and live in a city full of immigrants. Perhaps your own relatives were immigrants to the United States. But have you ever listened to their stories? With an historical and sociological framework as a basis, we will take an in-depth and more personal look at the immigrant experience as expressed through the immigrants’ own voices in literature and film. Topics explored include: assimilation, cultural identity and Americanization, exploitation and the American Dream, ethnic communities, gender, discrimination and stereotyping.

Race & Poverty in the Americas

ANTHROPOLOGY 0833, LATIN AMERICAN STUDIES 0833, 0933, RELIGION 0833, 0933 SOCIOLOGY 0833
The transatlantic slave trade was one of the most brutal and momentous experiences in human history. Attitudes toward Latino, Caribbean, African, and Asian immigrants in the United States today can only be fully understood in the contexts of slavery and the “structural racism,” “symbolic violence” (not to mention outright physical violence), and social inequalities that slavery has spawned throughout the region. Although focusing primarily on the United States, we will also study the present entanglements of poverty and race in Brazil, Haiti, and other selected nations of “The New World,” placing the US (and Philadelphia in particular) experience in this historical context.

Race on the Stage: Social Construction of Identity through Drama and the Arts

THEATER 0842
A unique taste of artistic diversity, this course combines traditional and interdisciplinary content with the rich experience of “live art.” Learn how conventions of the past contribute to arts production and the dramatic presentation of race, gender, sexuality, class and disability today, and how those presentations continue to inform notions of identity. As you read classic and contemporary dramatic texts and critically analyze actual performances, you will be looking at diversity from multiple perspectives and acquiring the kind of understanding of “difference” and “tolerance” that will prepare you to live and work in a global world.

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